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Friday
Aug 22nd

40 acres an NFL contract (Part 2 of 2)

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By Ryan T. Scott

If your girlfriend was sister to an NFL player making $15 million dollars per year, would you: A. Find a gun, gather up the homies and map out a plan to rob him; or B. Get together your best business idea and be really good to his sister - that way you don't mess up and kill somebody. Then you can't get a dime and instead do some time.
Calvin Johnson

If your girlfriend was sister to an NFL player making $15 million dollars per year, would you: A. Find a gun, gather up the homies and map out a plan to rob him; or B. Get together your best business idea and be really good to his sister - that way you don't mess up and kill somebody. Then you can't get a dime and instead do some time.

The Black KKK is on a mission of late. Having claimed the lives of a few very special, very accomplished young professionals in the NFL, they are indicating a particular intention to target a special niche in our cultural community. Strangely, it could be seen as an opportunity, or perhaps spark a necessary epiphany.

Trivia question #2: What two professions cut some of the fattest checks to African-Americans? You got it! Athletics and entertainment.

We should be proud of our successful family (We Are family) members who strive and achieve in the arts and athletics. They are in the forefront of the public eye. What the nation and the world see in them, they see in all of us. These professional groups are the window to our community, like it or not.

There are many cases, seen and unseen, where the community service efforts by these very blessed professionals are quite effective and profound. Think of the strides in our community made by Magic Johnson, Arthur Ashe, Muhammad Ali, Oprah Winfrey, Kevin Garnett, Tiger Woods and countless others. These are examples from the higher end of the income bracket, but there is good work done by many others that goes unseen. As the saying goes, "To whom much is given, much is required."

The Black community of recent decades seems to constantly be in search of leaders to spark change and inspire movement. Leaders are the people who take initiative above and beyond common initiative. Leaders go slightly, or radically, against the grain. More than anything, leaders are led by love. This love is built from a vision of something better, for one and for all.

How much more powerful would the efforts of Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, Marcus Garvey and others have been if they had a bunch of well loved multi-millionaires to infuse some cash and celebrity into their movements? Just ask Barak Obama how much he appreciates Oprah Winfrey these days. There is a great chance Oprah will suffer in some way, but Oprah realizes that "To whom much is given, much is required."

No, we don't have Martin Luther King. No, we don't have Malcolm X. But what we do have are teams like the Dallas Cowboys with a payroll of about $120,000,000, and most other teams are right behind them. What we also have is that 66% of the NFL players are African-American. How about the NBA, where 80% of the players are African-American?

Okay, so help me understand: Why are so many of our Black youth not making it to college? Why are so many of our Black community schools under-funded and closing at rapid rates? Why do so many Black businesses struggle? Especially when I can tell you from mall experience that some of our wealthy athletes stroll around the mall desperately searching for anything to spend some money on. I would call them when a new shipment of way overpriced stuff came in and they would show up within thirty minutes and blow $500 with quickness.

I went to school in a college town where an NFL training camp was held every summer. It certainly wasn't hard to tell the difference between the Black players and the other players when they rolled their cars into town. I always wondered how someone 6'5" fit into a Lamborghini. I also wonder why I have never seen reports of non-Black ex-players being broke and sleeping under bridges . . . not that it doesn't happen.

The value of hard core community investment was temporarily lost with many other core c
 

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