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Nov 27th

Obama takes Potomac Primary

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U. S. Sen. Barack Obama won big this week over Sen. Hillary Clinton in their contest to win the Democrat nomination to the presidency. In a clean sweep of Tuesday's Potomac Primary - Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia - Obama took his number of pledged delegates to 1,215 to Clinton's 1,189. "This movement won't stop until there's change in Washington. Tonight, we're on our way," declared Obama at a thunderous rally in Madison, Wis., where he moved ahead to campaign for votes in Wisconsin's Feb. 19 primary. Hawaii will also hold a primary that day. WASHINGTON (NNPA)- U. S. Sen. Barack Obama won big this week over Sen. Hillary Clinton in their contest to win the Democrat nomination to the presidency. In a clean sweep of Tuesday's Potomac Primary - Washington, D.C., Maryland and Virginia - Obama took his number of pledged delegates to 1,215 to Clinton's 1,189. "This movement won't stop until there's change in Washington. Tonight, we're on our way," declared Obama at a thunderous rally in Madison, Wis., where he moved ahead to campaign for votes in Wisconsin's Feb. 19 primary. Hawaii will also hold a primary that day.

Photo credit: studiotobechi

''This is what change looks like when it happens from the bottom up,'' he told the Madison crowd in the televised speech. "This is the new American majority."
Obama's reference to a "movement" not only hits home with African-American voters, but with battle-weary voters of all races. Polls have shown that concern over the war in Iraq and economic issues are fueling the swelling support for Democratic candidates after eight years of the Bush administration.

Meanwhile, Sen. Clinton is scheduled to kick off her campaign in Wisconsin on Saturday. She is scheduled to attend a Democratic Dinner in Milwaukee.
With 2,025 delegates needed to win the nomination, it is still far from final who will come out the Democratic nominee. There are 18 more primaries to go with 1,375 more delegates up for grabs.

The next primaries are: Feb. 19: Hawaii and Wisconsin; March 4: Ohio, Rhode Island, Texas and Vermont; March 8: Wyoming; March 11: Mississippi; April 22: Pennsylvania; May 3: Guam; May 6: Indiana and North Carolina; May 13: West Virginia; May 20: Kentucky and Oregon; June 3: Montana and South Dakota; June 7: Puerto Rico.
Much debate is taking place over super delegates, Democratic Party leaders, who could break a tie if the race between Obama and Clinton are too close to call by the Aug. 25-28 Democratic Convention. Clinton currently has 261 super delegates to Obama's 178.
However, one super delegate, Jason Roe, appearing on CNN Tuesday night, predicted that a winner will be clear by the Pennsylvania primary April 22.

The big Potomac win comes after a weekend sweep also to Obama's favor. He won handily in primaries held in Nebraska, Louisiana and Washington State.
The Clinton campaign appears to be taking Obama's big wins in stride, anticipating comebacks with big primaries such as Texas with 228 delegates and Ohio with 161, both on March 4. Pennsylvania on April 22 with 188 delegates and North Carolina on May 6 with 134 delegates are also among the big prizes.

Obama's weekend and Tuesday wins came as no surprise. Polls have long shown him as favored in those states.

Working for Obama's favor in conservative Virginia were Richmond Mayor L. Douglas Wilder, who was elected there in 1989 as the nation's first Black governor; the endorsements of U. S. Rep. Bobby Scott and Gov. Tim Kaine also helped. In Maryland, Rep. Elijah Cummings has longed campaigned for Obama. In D. C., Mayor Adrian Fenty has supported Obama. Also, amidst the excitement of this week's primary, another key Obama endorsement was announced.

D. C. Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton announced her endorsement of Obama.
"Barack will be an exceptional president,'' she said in a statement. ''He is the president that our country, our party and this city needs at this turning point in our history."

As a super delegate for the convention, Holmes said she had expected to make her endorsement closer to the general election. However, she explained that she felt the need to announce her choice in order to commit her super delegate vote to Obama if it is needed in a tie.

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