Insight News

Monday
Apr 21st

Public meetings address PFCs in drinking water

E-mail Print PDF

Six meetings will be held across Washington and Dakota counties on March 4, 2008 to communicate the impact of and response to discovery of perfluorochemicals found in drinking water. At the public meetings, officials will explain revised standards for PFCs in drinking water, and will give results of new sampling of water from area wells. Six meetings will be held across Washington and Dakota counties on March 4, 2008 to communicate the impact of and response to discovery of perfluorochemicals found in drinking water. At the public meetings, officials will explain revised standards for PFCs in drinking water, and will give results of new sampling of water from area wells. The meetings will include an open house, presentation and question and answer session.

Sampling begun in late 2004 revealed PFCs and similar chemicals in groundwater and some city wells. PFCs have been used for many years by area manufacturers to develop products that resist heat, oil, grease, stains and water.

Taking responsibility for the required cleanup, 3M Corporation is designing and financing activated carbon treatment plants, connecting households with private wells to city water systems, and installing filters on private wells in some cases.

3M wants to assure residents their water is safe to drink, even with PFCs present. PFCs have not been found to have any human health risks, according to Carol Ley, a 3M occupational health official. The Minnesota Department of Health in 2007 lowered its recommended maximums based on new research. Concentrations in many areas were found to be near what health officials consider to pose little or no risk.

Residents are encouraged to learn more by attending one of the meetings on March 4, 2008 or by calling the Minnesota Department of Health at 651-201-4897.
 

Recent Comments

Powered by Disqus



Facebook Twitter RSS Image Map

Latest show

  • April 15, 2014
    Sonny Singh, trumpet player for Red Baraat. Sheila Raye Charles and Reverend Colin Akehurst with MetroHope Recovery Ministries.

Business & Community Service Network