Insight News

Wednesday
Apr 16th

Full Measure: Bidding for DFL Senate nomination, Mike Ciresi, says people want opportunity to reach their potential

E-mail Print PDF

Attorney Mike Ciresi says he will kick in the doors of power in Washington, D.C. and fight to guarantee all Americans have access and opportunity to reach the full measure of their potential. "We have the same essential needs, wants and desires," he told the broadcast audience last Tuesday on KFAI's Conversations with Al McFarlane Public Policy Forum at Midtown Global Market, on Lake Street in Minneapolis. "There should be no boundaries created by color, race, ethnicity or anything else."
Attorney Mike Ciresi

Attorney Mike Ciresi says he will kick in the doors of power in Washington, D.C. and fight to guarantee all Americans have access and opportunity to reach the full measure of their potential. "We have the same essential needs, wants and desires," he told the broadcast audience last Tuesday on KFAI's Conversations with Al McFarlane Public Policy Forum at Midtown Global Market, on Lake Street in Minneapolis. "There should be no boundaries created by color, race, ethnicity or anything else."

Ciresi is seeking the DFL nomination in 2008 to challenge Republican incumbent Norm Coleman in the US Senate.

"We can get there by education and by having people in contact with each other," Ciresi said. "I don't have a magic wand to eliminate racism. We all struggle with the issue. All have experienced a racist thought. Who can deny that? What we can do is start educating people and providing opportunity for everyone to reach his or her full potential."

Rev. Randolph Staten, co-chair of the Coalition of Black Churches/African American Leadership Summit, challenged Ciresi to address the gaping disparities in quality of life for Black Minnesotan's and other persons of color versus white Minnesotans. He said while Minnesota is one of the wealthiest states in the country, with 9.7% of whites at or below the poverty line, 49.8% of people of color live at or below the poverty line. "And more than half of Black Minnesotans live in a state of poverty," Rev. Staten said.

Rates of incarceration, unemployment, home mortgage loan rejection, added to disparities in education and health outcomes paint a dire picture of dismal failure by government policy in Minnesota and in the nation, he said. "If whites were to experience the same level of catastrophe as Blacks, Minnesota would be saying 'Stop the world!' and devoting attention and resources to fix the problem."

Candidate Ciresi said (George) Bush and Norm Coleman's tax policies have supported the wealth and gutted opportunity for the middle class, causing a backward slide on top of those trying to move up the economic ladder. "I believe health care should be a matter of right and not of privilege," he said. "The Bush tax cuts have meant 'no limousine is left behind.' We provided opportunity for the rich and powerful, but ordinary people are being left behind. We need a complete revision of our Internal Revenue Code. The Internal Revenue Code should reflect the values we hold as a nation. It should not be a piggy bank for the wealthy and powerful. That's what we have seen for the past 27 years, starting with President Reagan."

Ciresi, a life-long Minnesota resident, said his father had a 7th grade education and spoke broken English. He said his mother died of breast cancer when he was young. His dad was a small business owner, Ciresi said, like the merchants in Midtown Global Market. Back then, he was able to afford health insurance for his family, but he wouldn't have been able to afford it today. In recent years healthcare costs have skyrocketed by 70% while wages have risen only 15%. "We are sliding backwards. People are not able to take care of their families and children. Folks are not climbing up the economic ladder. People don't have a chance. We have to reinvigorate the economy and restore the vibrancy of the middle class," Ciresi said.

"I am running because I lived the American Dream because people invested in me. A generation ago the state and the nation invested in education. I am a beneficiary of that investment. That's what I want to do for our children," he said.

Ciresi said he favors a federal health board, structured like the Federal Reserve Board that would establish a
 

Recent Comments

Powered by Disqus



Facebook Twitter RSS Image Map

Latest show

  • April 15, 2014
    Sonny Singh, trumpet player for Red Baraat. Sheila Raye Charles and Reverend Colin Akehurst with MetroHope Recovery Ministries.

Business & Community Service Network