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Apr 24th

PJ Richardson: Life coaching via the Queen’s Project

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penny-jones-richardsonThe Queen’s Project, a self-esteem building school program that is facilitated by its founder, Penny “P.J.” Jones-Richardson, sparked inspiration for the novel, “Nobody told me I was a Queen.”

The Queen’s Project was founded to help women empower themselves through knowing their self-worth. “This isn’t about being overconfident and stuck on yourself,” said Jones-Richardson. “It is just basically realizing that ‘I am important.’ I just wanted to be that person to help build self-esteem. I want to see young women reach their goals.”

The group discusses various topics ranging from body image to hygiene. For the book, Jones-Richardson focused on the personal stories of the participants.
“I hear a lot of stories of abuse, self-abuse,” said Jones-Richardson.

The published author also drew from her own struggles and life experiences.

“I was a teenage mom,” said Jones-Richardson. “It affected my self-esteem because I spent a lot of time being ashamed. I felt like my life was over and in some ways I pulled away from the friends I had before. The advice I would give to teen moms today is to never give up on their dreams and goals. Being a teen mom does not have to stop you from achieving your goals.”

nobody-told-me-i-was-a-queen book-coverAlthough Jones-Richardson is the family and community liaison at Nellie Stone Johnson Community School, 807 N. 27th Ave., Minneapolis, she also works as a part-time life coach.
Jones-Richardson has become accustomed to being a mentor.

“I am always the one who family and friends come to for advice anyway,” said Jones-Richardson with a laugh. “I thought it (being a life coach) would be a great way to help people with self-esteem and goal setting.”

The life coach and author believes by building self-esteem in individuals, the community that these individuals reside in can become better as well.
“Having positive self-esteem you can build leaders,” said Jones-Richardson. “The children are our future they are the leaders.”

Jones-Richardson will soon have a section in Insight News called “Motivational Moments.” Each piece will offer words of encouragement.

“I just wanted to get my words out. I want to reach someone and maybe somebody needed to hear what I had to say to help change their life,” said Jones-Richardson.

In the future, the founder of Queen’s Project plans on having a life class for women ages 18 and up. She says it will deal with self-esteem and goal setting, but with a different format then the Queen’s Project.
“Nobody Told Me I Was A Queen” was published in March of this year.

For more information about the Queen’s Project and upcoming events, contact Jones-Richardson at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

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