Insight News

Tuesday
Sep 30th

Health

Milk in...bags?

Milk in...bags?Dear EarthTalk: I've been hearing about the popularity of milk sold in bags (as opposed to plastic or cardboard cartons) in India, Europe and Canada. What are the environmental advantages to milk in bags, and do you think it will catch on in the U.S.? And what other options are out there for milk drinkers trying to be green? -- Paul Howe, San Francisco, CA
Read more...
 

(Earth Talk) Are this past winter's storms a sign of global warming?

(Earth Talk) Are this past winter's storms a sign of global warming?Dear EarthTalk: The U.S. got socked with several major storms this past winter. Local weather reports never mentioned this as odd. But is it a sign of global warming? -- R.A. Forbes, via e-mail

Weather patterns and trends are notoriously unpredictable, varying due to a great many different inputs. While it’s true that snowier, stormier winters could be the result of global warming, many meteorologists believe that El Nino—a climate pattern involving warmer-than-usual sea temperatures across the tropical Pacific that affects weather all over the globe—is mainly to blame for this past winter’s ongoing white misery.

Read more...

National Cancer Institute: An information resource for African-Americans confronting cancer

National Cancer Institute: An information resource for African-Americans confronting cancerNNPA Special Commentary

(NNPA) - Do you know someone– a family member, a co-worker, a neighbor from down the street, or someone from your church – someone who has just been diagnosed with cancer? Or are you interested in finding the latest about reducing your risk of cancer? Where can you turn to find solid, accurate information that could help you or a loved one deal with cancer?

One good place to turn to is the National Cancer Institute (NCI). NCI is a reliable, trusted source of free cancer information that you can access over the Internet, by telephone, or through easy-to-understand pamphlets and brochures.
Read more...

Health reform makes healthcare a civil right in America

ATLANTA—When health reform was signed into law, Vice President Joe Biden was ridiculed for his use of an off-color adjective in describing the legislation to President Obama.  But lost in the rhetorical battle over health reform is the fact that Mr. Biden’s words were accurate: This is a big deal!

By getting the landmark legislation enacted, President Obama has transformed his presidency and ushered in fundamental changes to America’s healthcare system, changes that will have a profound impact on millions of African Americans and other people of color.   Lack of health insurance is a factor in one of the biggest inequities in American society – the health disparities that prematurely end lives and cause undue pain and suffering in minority communities across the country.    
Read more...

Fremont Community Clinics celebrates 40th Anniversary with a name change

Fremont Community Clinics celebrates 40th Anniversary with a name changeAs Fremont Community Clinics celebrates its 40th Anniversary, it’s also looking to the future with a change of the organization name to Neighborhood HealthSource. The change was announced recently at Fremont’s 40th Anniversary Gala at Target Field. The three clinic names will remain the same and the focus will continue to be on the vital services each provides to its surrounding neighborhoods.

According to Executive Director Steve Knutson, “Fremont is changing its organization name to better reflect what it provides, not just the high quality medical services at our clinics, but also through various outreach programs in the communities and partnerships with other local non-profits and service providers to improve the health in our neighborhoods.”
Read more...

(Earth Talk) Toxic flea collars

(Earth Talk) Toxic flea collarsDear EarthTalk: I’m told that, despite improvements in recent years, pesticides in flea collars are still harmful to pets and humans. Are there ways to minimize fleas without resorting to chemical concoctions? And is anything being done to ban these dangerous products from store shelves?
-- Nancy Trouffant, Lancaster, PA


Americans spend some $1 billion each year on products designed to combat fleas. Many of these products do their jobs handsomely, but two of the most egregious chemicals widely used in flea collars, tetrachlorvinphos and propoxur, have been shown to cause damage to our brains and nervous systems, and are known human carcinogens. Residues containing these chemicals can stay on a pet’s fur—and whatever he or she rubs up against, including your rugs, furniture and children—for weeks on end.
Read more...

(Earth Talk) Atrazine in drinking water

(Earth Talk) Atrazine in drinking waterDear EarthTalk: I understand there’s an issue with the herbicide atrazine showing up in dangerous quantities in drinking water, mostly throughout the central U.S. Why is this happening and what’s being done about it? -- Marcus Gerde, Spokane, WA

Atrazine is an herbicide that is widely used across the U.S. and elsewhere to control both broadleaf and grassy weeds in large-scale agricultural operations growing corn, sorghum, sugar cane and other foods. While its use is credited with increasing agricultural yields by as much as six percent, there is a dark side. The nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) reports that atrazine exposure has been shown to impair the reproductive systems of amphibians and mammals, and has been linked to cancer in both laboratory animals and humans. Male frogs exposed to minute doses of atrazine can develop female sex characteristics, including hermaphroditism and the presence of eggs in the testes. Researchers suspect that these effects are amplified when atrazine and other harmful agricultural chemicals are employed together.

Read more...
Page 83 of 110

Recent Comments

Powered by Disqus



Facebook Twitter RSS Image Map

Latest show

  • September 23, 2014
    State Representative Rena Moran (65-A), Verlena Matey-Keke, and Professor Nekima Levy-Pounds.

Business & Community Service Network