Insight News

Sunday
Nov 23rd

Education

UNCF move to D.C. to expand advocacy and service to students

Seeking to expand its support of education for Americans of color, UNCF (the United Negro College Fund) will move its national headquarters from Fairfax, Virginia into Washington, D.C. in 2012.  UNCF, the nation’s largest and most effective minority education organization has begun construction on a 50,000 square-foot office at Progression Place, located at 1805 7th Street, NW, in D.C.’s surging Shaw neighborhood.  Nationally known for its motto, “A mind is a terrible thing to waste”®, the 10,000 college scholarships it awards each year, and the 39 historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) it represents, UNCF will continue to advocate for the rights of low income and minority students and push for education reform. 
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First Book: Grants for summer reading programs

First Book—Greater Minneapolis/St. Paul has announced grants to purchase books for summer reading programs that serve up to 100 children from low-income households in the counties of Anoka, Hennepin, Carver, Scott, Washington, Ramsey and Dakota.  Applications from organizations that are approved will receive funds in time to provide resources for their summer reading programs.
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Imhotep: Father of medicine, step pyramid

Imhotep: Father of medicine, step pyramidBlack History Month is an important time for people of African descent. It is a special occasion for us to reflect on the struggles we have been through and the accomplishments we have made. WE WIN Institute teaches children from K-12 about African history and culture. No matter what the nationality of the children we serve, we teach them all about the accomplishments of African Americans. It is important for all children to know and understand the great contributions of people of African descent.
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Governor Dayton, Commissioner Cassellius Lay out Vision for Education Reform

Reaffirming his commitment to make education a top priority of his administration, Governor Mark Dayton, along with Commissioner of Education Brenda Cassellius, laid out his vision for comprehensive education reform in Minnesota.  Better Schools for a Better Minnesota lays out a seven-point plan for education reform designed to help every Minnesota student succeed.  Governor Dayton says that he will keep his campaign promise to increase funding for education. The plan will also focus on closing achievement gaps by focusing on earliest learners.
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Imagining the Possibilities of Risen Expectations

Imagining the Possibilities of Risen ExpectationsRisen Christ School continues to push its motto of preparing children for success in work and life by exposing them to local entrepreneurs and business owners in the Twin Cities area with their program Imagine Possibilities. Serving a predominantly Latin and African American child population, grades K–8, Fran Murnane, Director of Development, found it vital to introduce students to successful entrepreneurs, specifically ones of color. With the help of Yvonne Cheung Ho, president and CEO of Metropolitan Economic Development Association (MEDA) and others, Risen Christ has set out to ensure their 8th graders have a head start on their futures.
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Report on remedial education shows gaps in college preparation

According to a new report—Getting Prepared: A 2010 Report on Recent High School Graduates Who Took Developmental/Remedial Courses, released by the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities and the University of Minnesota—40% of Minnesota's recent public high school graduates who enrolled in public higher education in the state have taken at least one developmental or remedial course within two years after graduation: up slightly from 38%, three years ago.
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HBCUs critical to education goals

HBCUs critical to education goals(FinalCall.com) - The nation's Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have served this country since 1837.

They educated freed slaves, offering educational opportunities not afforded to Blacks at White institutions during the days of legally mandated segregation.

Many highly successful CEOs, doctors, entertainers, educators, lawyers, engineers, and politicians graduated from these institutions.
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