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Apr 24th

Will Bill Clinton legacy hinder Hillary Clinton?

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Will Bill Clinton legacy hinder Hillary Clinton?

Clinton said that the images shown on TV during the New Orleans disaster were not pictures of the America she and others love and believe in: "That's George Bush's America," she shouted. Yet, is she a true alternative to Bush or just the flipside of the same coin? Hillary Clinton spoke in Denver recently, the city where many believe she will become the nominee for president next summer at the Democratic National Convention. The New York senator spoke of the work that needs to be done to "make the American dream real again," but when was it ever real for Blacks in the country? She made reference to Hurricane Katrina, whose victims were handled much differently than the hundreds of thousands recently affected by the devastating wildfires in affluent California areas. Once again it was shown how the government responds differently to disasters which primarily affect Blacks versus those that devastate predominantly white areas. This is one of many examples that could be used to show that the "American dream" is little more than a continuing nightmare for Blacks.

Clinton said that the images shown on TV during the New Orleans disaster were not pictures of the America she and others love and believe in: "That's George Bush's America," she shouted. Yet, is she a true alternative to Bush or just the flipside of the same coin? If chosen for the highest office in the land, is there any importance to the fact that the last string of presidents would read: Bush, Clinton, Bush, Clinton? What is behind the blind love affair many Blacks have with the Clintons? Some, like the Congressional Black Caucus in 2001, referred to Bill Clinton as the "first Black president." He was even made an honorary member of the Arkansas Black Hall of Fame in 2002.

Earlier this year, an Alabama church full of Black Christians gave Hillary Clinton hearty applause and cheers when she attempted to speak with a southern drawl while reciting the words to the "Negro" spiritual hymn, "I Don't Feel No Ways Tired." And "we" applauded her rather than being insulted?

Her words may have been well received, but there are other times she is confronted by those who question her reported involvement with the Bilderberg Group - described as a "secretive, shadow government." In "The True Story of the Bilderberg Group," writer Daniel Estulin makes the case that this shadow government's top priority is to do away with sovereign nation states and place them under the jurisdiction of "an electronic global police state." Estulin claims that both Clintons are members of this group.

According to Black Listed News (BLN), Hillary Clinton has been approached by activists in California, Nevada and New York about her affiliation with the group but has yet to issue a response. If she is a friend, agent or puppet of this so-called "shadow government," how much of a true friend can she be to Blacks or anyone else? On the other hand, if she, like her husband, is apparently going to be given a free pass by Black voters, can they complain if they get the same, or worse, results? Will they stand and applaud for the Democratic frontrunner if the 2002 words of civil rights organizer Kevin Alexander Gray, about former President Clinton, also ring true for her?

"... Black incarceration rates during the Clinton years surpassed Ronald Reagan's eight years. The incarceration rates for Blacks increased from around 3,000 per 100,000 to 3,620 per 100,000 people," Gray said in an op-ed entitled "Clinton and Black Americans Soul Brother." "[Clinton's] policies and attitudes on due process, equal protection/treatment, or civil rights were horrible."

Adeeba Folami is a freelance journalist residing in Denver, Colorado. She can be reached via her website: http://bhonline.org.
 

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