Insight News

Sunday
Nov 23rd

Business

An iHoliday, anyone?

When parents read the holiday classic, The Night before Christmas to their children, assuming of course this is a tradition that is still being followed, are they doing it from a classic picture book? Or from an electronic device that ensures “visions of sugarplums” are literally dancing in full color across a tablet’s screen?  Do little girls still ask Santa for Barbies or Easy Bake Ovens (amazing what a strong light bulb can do, isn’t it)? And, little boys for trucks and action figures?  Do either still ask for shiny new bikes? (I was so excited the Christmas I got a tandem – you know a bicycle built for two – and I begged my mom to let me ride it right then and there in the snow … Best Christmas ever)! But, sadly no. According to a recent Nielsen survey, now when children make out their lists, there is a very good chance they are asking for an iPad.  Yes, you heard me correctly.

Read more...
 

How to stick to your New Year's money resolutions

How to stick to your New Year's money resolutions

 

Each year, Americans make well-intentioned resolutions to improve their lives and livelihood. From eating to exercise, personal growth to professional advancement, we love setting our sights on goals and reaching them.

This year, why not tackle some personal finance hurdles in your search for better living? 

Read more...

Not having money interferes with making money

Not having money interferes with making money

Reader Joe G. asks, “Is it really legal to not hire someone because of bad credit? I just heard I am not getting jobs because of my credit history.”

The short answer, Joe, is yes, it is legal to decline to hire someone because of their credit situation.  That said, employers who do make hiring decisions based on credit information are required by law to follow procedures so a candidate is aware of how the decision was made, and to ensure that the information obtained is not used for any purpose other than for hiring and promotion decisions.

Read more...

Mpls businesses eligible for grants of up to $10,000

Minneapolis businesses will be eligible to apply for grants of up to $10,000 to help improve their business operations and profitability.   The grants will be provided by the Economic Growth Centers(EGC), a non-profit economic development  organization, with staff assistance from the Metropolitan Consortium of Community Developers (MCCD).   Businesses will be eligible to apply for the EGC grants if they are located within the City of Minneapolis, have been in operation for at least a year, with sales of up to $500,000. Priority will be given to businesses located in the Whittier and Elliot Park neighborhoods. More information is available on the MCCD website at mccdmn.org or by calling 612-789-7337, ext 14.

Minneapolis businesses eligible for grants of up to $10,000

Minneapolis businesses will be eligible to apply for grants of up to $10,000 to help improve their business operations and profitability.   The grants will be provided by the Economic Growth Centers(EGC), a non-profit economic development  organization, with staff assistance from the Metropolitan Consortium of Community Developers (MCCD).   Businesses will be eligible to apply for the EGC grants if they are located within the City of Minneapolis, have been in operation for at least a year, with sales of up to $500,000. Priority will be given to businesses located in the Whittier and Elliot Park neighborhoods. More information is available on the MCCD website at mccdmn.org or by calling 612-789-7337, ext 14.

SOS: Under a deadline, under pressure

SOS:  Under a deadline, under pressure

 

Writing under a deadline brings out the defiance in me.  I do it all the time and despite my best efforts, I sometimes fall behind.  The words that ring in my ears are:  are you surprised to have arrived here?  No, I knew it was coming.  Yet, all the other deadlines came, too.  There is a better way to work.  What I am about to tell you works for me.  I should use it more often.
Read more...

2010 Census shows 65 and older population growing faster than total U.S. population

2010 Census shows 65 and older population growing faster than total U.S. population

The U.S. population 65 and older is now the largest in terms of size and percent of the population, compared with any previous census, according to a new 2010 Census brief released from the U.S. Census Bureau on the nation’s older population. The group grew at a faster rate than the total population between 2000 and 2010.


According to the 2010 Census, there were 40.3 million people 65 and older on April 1, 2010, increasing by 5.3 million since the 2000 Census when this population numbered 35.0 million. The percentage of the population 65 and older also increased during the previous decade. In 2010, the older population represented 13.0 percent of the total population, an increase from 12.4 percent in 2000.

Read more...
Page 58 of 115

Recent Comments

Powered by Disqus



Facebook Twitter RSS Image Map

Latest show

  • November 18, 2014
    Remembering Ackeesa Ta Harms-McFarlane. Scott McLain on Vivian Carter and Vee-Jay records.

Business & Community Service Network